Welcome to my glorious mess.

Ignored: early Atlanta Hip Hop

Posted in ATL, Atlanta, Atlanta Music, Podcast by Dom Brady on January 18, 2009

The youtube Record below is called “Jump, Stomp & Twist”. This is just one of the gems we’ve unearthed during research and interviews for a Documentary Film I’m working on in conjunction with Black Static Films called Telling it like it T- I- is: Atlanta Hip Hop from ’79-’til. We interview Hip Hop Artists, Journalists and

Photographers who have been in and around the underground Atlanta Hip Hop scene from the very begining. I’ll have clips up on Youtube and Vimeo in the up coming months after this Season of Analogue Atlanta, my audio series on Atlanta Arts, comes to an end in February. The information thus far has been amazing. Finding artists like Mo-jo and Dj Mann, Dj Lynn, Mike Fresh, Danny Renee? Nearly impossible.  There aren’t archives of V103’s Fresh Party- an early 80’s Hip Hop show hosted by Wanda Ramos. We have, however, tracked down Mc Shy D and others that were making records in the ’80s and early ’90s. What we want to do, God willing, is find some of the artists we know existed during the Late 70’s and early ’80s.  If you’re interested in the origins of Southern Hip Hop, which does begin in the ’70s, contrary to popular belief, check out former Creative Loafing Atlanta writer Roni Sarig’s book Third Coast: OutKast, Timbaland, and How Hip-Hop Became a Southern Thing  for starters.  It’s a page turner.

When you think about the legacy of musicians that made the crossover from Soul to Hip Hop like Funk man and later Hip Hop producer Wendell Parker who produced Danny Renee’s Space Rap pictured on the right in ’80, or even a STAXX Records musician like Rufus who made his own Hip Hop 7inch also produced by Parker as early as ’84 it’s easy to see how fertile the local Hip Hop scene became in Atlanta.   According to MC Shy D himself in an interview I MIGHT (can’t promise anything) post before we’re done wrapping, these records just didn’t make it out of the region due to poor distribution.  Fine.   That doesn’t mean that they didn’t exist and don’t deserve their proper place in history.  We aim to remedy that, where possible.  Journalists like Brian Lassiter, Roni Sarig and Shannon McCollum as well as scholars like Matt Miller have already done the hard part.  What we’re trying to do is use their work  along with some elbow grease of our own to bring these artists, this period in Atlanta music history to light.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: